Consumer medicine information

Sevorane®

Sevorane® (see-voh-rayn)

Active ingredient(s): sevoflurane (see-voh-flu-rayn)


Consumer Medicine Information (CMI)

This leaflet provides important information about using Sevorane. You should also speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist if you would like further information or if you have any concerns or questions about using Sevorane.

Where to find information in this leaflet:

1. Why am I using Sevorane?
2. What should I know before I use Sevorane?
3. What if I am taking other medicines?
4. How is Sevorane given?
5. What should I know while using Sevorane?
6. Are there any side effects?
7. Product details

1. Why am I using Sevorane?

Sevorane contains the active ingredient sevoflurane.

Sevorane is an anaesthetic medicine used to put you to sleep during an operation or procedure. It is given by a mask for you to breathe it in.

It is suitable for both adults and children.

2. What should I know before I use Sevorane?

Warnings

Do not use Sevorane if:

  • you have ever had a bad reaction to Sevorane or other similar anaesthetic medicines
  • you or a member of your family have had malignant hyperthermia (a dramatic rise in body temperature) when given Sevorane or a similar anaesthetic medicine.

Check with your doctor if you:

  • have or have had problems with your liver
  • have or have had problems with your heart
  • have or have had problems with your kidneys
  • have received Sevorane or a similar anaesthetic medicine within the last 3 months
  • take any medicines for any other condition.

Check with the doctor if your child:

  • has a condition called Pompe’s disease, a disease that causes muscle weakness and difficulty breathing
  • has or has had convulsions or fits.

During treatment, you may be at risk of developing certain side effects. It is important you understand these risks and how to monitor for them. See additional information under Section 6. Are there any side effects?

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

Make sure your doctor is aware that you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Sevorane can affect the uterus (womb) causing it to relax which can lead to bleeding.

Make sure you doctor is aware that you are breastfeeding or intend to breastfeed.

Children

Discuss the risks of your child receiving Sevorane with your doctor prior to surgery.

3. What if I am taking other medicines?

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking any other medicines, including any medicines, vitamins or supplements that you buy without a prescription from your pharmacy, supermarket or health food shop.

Some medicines may interfere with Sevorane and affect how it works; while Sevorane may affect how other medicines work.

You will be under the care of your doctors during your operation. They will determine if you need additional medicines. The list below only includes medicines that you may already be taking.

Medicines that may increase the effect of Sevorane include:

  • monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI), a particular type of medicine used to treat depression, e.g. phenylzine, tranylcypromine
  • isoniazid, a medicine used to treat infections caused by bacteria (antibiotic)
  • barbiturates, older medicines sometimes used to treat epilepsy

Medicines where Sevorane may increase their effect include:

  • calcium channel blockers, medicines that cause blood vessels to relax and widen which improves oxygen supply to the heart, and lowers blood pressure (e.g. diltiazem, verapamil)
  • opioids, medicines used mostly for treating strong pain, such as oxycodone, morphine, methadone
  • benzodiazepines, medicines that work in the brain used to treat anxiety, and to relax muscles (e.g. diazepam, clonazepam).

Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure about what medicines, vitamins or supplements you are taking and if these affect Sevorane.

4. How is Sevorane given?

How much is given

  • Your doctor will determine the correct dose for you depending on the procedure, how long the effect needs to last, and any risk factors that need to be considered.

When Sevorane is given

  • Your doctor will determine the best time to give you Sevorane depending on your procedure.
  • You may receive other medicines, including by injection, before and during your procedure.

In some instances, following your procedure, other medicines may need to be taken, such as to relieve pain. Your doctor will let you know which medicines, how to take them and how long to take them.

Please look for the QR code on the medicine pack. Scan this code with your smart phone for more information on Sevorane.

If you think you have received too much Sevorane

You should immediately:

  • phone the Poisons Information Centre
    (by calling 13 11 26), or
  • contact your doctor, or
  • go to the Emergency Department at your nearest hospital.

You should do this even if there appear to be no signs of discomfort or poisoning.

5. What should I know while using Sevorane?

Things you should do

  • Follow all instructions given to you by your doctors and nurses before and after your procedure.

Tell your doctor or nurse straight away if:

  • you notice your skin or eyes look yellow and/or you have pain or swelling in the tummy
  • your child’s arms or legs twitching, eyes rolling to the back of the head, changes in breathing.

Remind any doctor, dentist or pharmacist you visit that you have recently had a procedure and received Sevorane.

Driving or using machines

Do not drive or use machinery after receiving Sevorane until your doctor tells you it is safe.

Drinking alcohol

Check with your doctor how long to wait before you can drink alcohol.

Looking after your medicine

The hospital will store your medicine before use.

6. Are there any side effects?

All medicines can have side effects. If you do experience any side effects, most of them are minor and temporary. However, some side effects may need medical attention.

You will be monitored during your procedure for side effects.

See the information below about possible side effects that may occur after your procedure. If you need to, ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any further questions about side effects.

Less serious side effects

Less serious side effects What to do
Gut:

  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • increased saliva

Brain and nerves:

  • headache
  • dizziness
  • drowsiness
  • agitation (feeling tense or troubled, excessively stressed)

Airways:

  • cough
  • increased saliva.
Tell your doctor or nurse, if you notice any of these less serious side effects and they worry you.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects What to do
Uterus or womb:

  • bleeding, similar to a period, that is unexpected

Liver:

  • yellowing of the eyes and/or skin
  • pain or swelling in the tummy

Children:

  • Signs of a seizure, including twitching, jerking movements, eyes rolling to the back of the head, changes in breathing.
Tell your doctor or nurse straight away, if you notice any of these serious side effects.

Tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist if you notice anything else that may be making you feel unwell.

Other side effects not listed here may occur in some people.

Reporting side effects

After you have received medical advice for any side effects you experience, you can report side effects to the Therapeutic Goods Administration online at www.tga.gov.au/reporting-problems. By reporting side effects, you can help provide more information on the safety of this medicine.

7. Product details

This medicine is only available with a doctor’s prescription.

This medicine is only available in a hospital or clinic.

What Sevorane contains

Active ingredient
(main ingredient)
sevoflurane
Other ingredients
(inactive ingredients)
There are no other ingredients

What Sevorane looks like

Sevorane is a colourless, clear liquid, supplied in a plastic 250 mL bottle (Aust R 51919).

Who distributes Sevorane?

Sevorane is distributed in Australia by:

AbbVie Pty Ltd
241 O’Riordan Street
MASCOT NSW 2020
Australia

This leaflet was prepared on 5 November 2020.