Vaccination: Australian Standard Vaccination Schedule

This table shows vaccinations included in the Australian National Immunisation Schedule Program as well as some other recommended vaccinations. Below the table is a brief explanation of the types of vaccinations used.

Vaccine
Birth
Hepatitis B
2 months
HepB-DTPa_Hib_IPV
(hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough), Haemophilus influenzae type B, polio)
Pneumococcal vaccine
(13vPCV)
Rotavirus
4 months
HepB-DTPa_Hib_IPV
(hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough), Haemophilus influenzae type B, polio)
Pneumococcal vaccine
(13vPCV)
Rotavirus
6 months
HepB-DTPa_Hib_IPV
(hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough), Haemophilus influenzae type B, polio)
Pneumococcal vaccine
(13vPCV)
Rotavirus (third dose is dependent on the brand of vaccine used)
12 months
Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)
Hib-MenC (Haemophilus influenzae type B and meningococcal C)
Children with underlying medical conditions: Pneumococcal vaccine
(13vPCV)
12-18 months
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in high-risk areas: Pneumococcal vaccine
(13vPCV)
12-24 months
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in high-risk areas: Hepatitis A - 2 doses
18 months
Measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox (MMRV)
DTPa-IPV
4 years
DTPa-IPV (Diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough) and inactivated polio)
If MMRV was not given at 18 months, then Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)
Children with underlying medical conditions: Pneumococcal vaccine (23vPPV)
10-15 years (depends on State or Territory)
Hepatitis B
(only for children who have not received hepatitis B vaccine previously - as above)
Chickenpox (Varicella)
HPV vaccine
DTPa
Pregnant women
Influenza (flu)
DTPa (in 3rd trimester)
15-49 years
People at risk: Influenza (flu) - every year
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: Influenza - every year
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people medically at risk: Pneumococcal vaccine (23vPPV)
50 years
Tetanus & diphtheria
(unless a booster given in previous 10 years)
50 years and over 
(Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people): Pneumococcal vaccine (23vPPV)
Influenza (flu) - every year
65 years and over
Pneumococcal vaccine (23vPPV)
Influenza (flu) - every year
DTPa (if not given in previous 10 years)
70-79 years
Shingles (herpes zoster): from Nov 2016

Guide to the medical abbreviations used for the vaccines and diseases

Here is a guide to the terms used by doctors and healthcare workers to talk about the various vaccines. They have been colour coded to match the different vaccines on the chart.

Abbreviations used in the vaccination schedule
AbbreviationMeaning
ChickenpoxChickenpox (Varicella) vaccine.
DTPaDiphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough) vaccine.
DTPa-IPVDiphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough) and inactivated polio vaccine.
Hep AHepatitis A
Hep BHepatitis B
Hep B-DTPa-Hib-IPVHepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough), Haemophilus influenza type B, inactivated polio
Hib-MenCHaemophilus influenzae type B and meningococcal C
HPVHuman papillomavirus (infection with some types of HPV can cause cervical cancer and genital warts).
InfluenzaInfluenza (flu) vaccine
IPVInactivated polio vaccine (IPV) may be given as part of a combination vaccine incorporating other vaccines due at the same time.
MMRMeasles, mumps, rubella vaccine
MMRVMeasles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox vaccine
Pneumococcal (13vPCV)A type of pneumococcal vaccine known as 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, that helps protect against 13 serotypes of the bacterium — the ones that cause the majority of pneumococcal disease in young children.
Pneumococcal (23vPPV)A type of pneumococcal vaccine known as 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, that helps protect against 23 serotypes of the bacterium.
RotavirusThe most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children.
ShinglesShingles (herpes zoster)
TdCombined diphtheria and tetanus vaccine
Last Reviewed: 29 September 2015
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References

1. Australian Government Department of Health. National Immunisation Program Schedule. http://www.immunise.health.gov.au/internet/immunise/publishing.nsf/Content/nips (accessed Sept 2015).
2. Australian Government Department of Health. Immunise Australia Program. Older Australians. Updated Aug 2015. http://www.immunise.health.gov.au/internet/immunise/publishing.nsf/Content/older-australians (accessed Sept 2015).
3. Australian Government Department of Health. Immunise Australia Program. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People. Updated April 2015. http://www.immunise.health.gov.au/internet/immunise/publishing.nsf/Content/aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-people (accessed Sept 2015).
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